SPECIAL OFFER: Three resources that stretch our understanding of narrative responses to trauma

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We’re delighted to offer a special package of three recent publications/resources that stretch our understanding of narrative responses to trauma:



  • Strengthening Resistance: The use of narrative practices in responding to genocide survivors

    This publication documents ways in which narrative practices can be used to respond to individual and collective trauma. In late 2007, David Denborough, Jill Freedman and Cheryl White from the Dulwich Centre Foundation (Australia) and the Evanston Family Therapy Center (USA) headed to Kigali, Rwanda, to provide support and narrative skills training to 34 trauma counsellors and assistant lawyers, all of whom are themselves survivors of the Rwandan genocide. This publication documents what was addressed during the workshop. It also documents the skills and knowledges of genocide survivors in dealing with the effects of trauma in their lives. This is a powerfully moving and inspiring testimony. At the same time, this publication practically demonstrate how narrative approaches can be used in situations of extreme trauma in order to strengthen hope in contexts of hopelessness. The publication is accompanied by a short DVD which contains the stories of the skills and knowledges of the Rwandan workers..

  • Responding to trauma that is not past: Strengthening stories of survival and resistance

    This first handbook about narrative approaches to therapy, group work, and community work from an Arabic perspective describes some of the key ideas and practices of narrative therapy and includes skilful and thoughtful examples of practice from Palestinian therapists. This handbook consists of four parts. The first describes the broader context of the narrative therapy work of Palestinian counsellors. The second documents a number of key narrative therapy practices and includes examples of Palestinian practice. Part Three conveys how narrative ideas are being used with groups and communities. And Part Four describes how Palestinian counsellors are trying to open possibilities for conversations around very difficult topics.

  • Working with memory in the shadow of genocide: The narrative practices of Ibuka trauma counsellors

    In 1994, the genocide in Rwanda claimed over one million human lives. Today, Ibuka, the national survivors’ association of Rwanda, has developed ways to respond.

    The Ibuka trauma counsellors have found ways to heal memories in the shadow of genocide.

    Together – and through their formal partnership with the Dulwich Centre Foundation International, based in Australia – they have developed local, innovative, culturally-appropriate methodologies, drawing on principles and practice of narrative therapy and community work.

    This publication documents the unique forms of therapeutic and collective practice that Ibuka workers are developing. It contains the stories of this work and its outcomes; the principles they are employing; examples of the methodologies; and ideas for how workers and organisations in other contexts can develop their own effective practices.

    Also included in this publication are innovations in narrative practice relating to multiple storylines of memory; personal memory/social memory; sharing the ‘problem of memory’, and ensuring the survival of ideals.

    Working with memory in the shadow of genocide is a document of both thoughtful and effective practice, as well as hope and inspiration.

    Working with memory in the shadow of genocide: The narrative practices of Ibuka trauma counsellors


  • These three resources are now available as a package for only $55 plus postage.

SPECIAL OFFER: Three resources that stretch our understanding of narrative responses to trauma